I’ve been tired for as long as I can remember.

In fact, one of the reasons I left my last job and started my businesses is because I needed my own schedule so that I could have more time and freedom to nap when I wanted to!

Sleeping for ten hours a day and then napping at every spare moment gets old. Faking feeling energetic all the time gets frustrating.

Luckily, having an organized home has made it all so much easier.

After a long day, the last thing you want to do is battle a messy home before your nap. When you have very little free time due to health issues, spending time on cleaning is not a top priority. However, having a clean home makes all the difference when it comes to dealing with additional stressors that come your way.

If you’re worried about environmental factors in the home, having less stuff can help ease the mind as well. Worried about dust? It’s much harder for dust to hide in a minimalistically adorned house. Air quality worries? When you have less stuff, there’s more room for bulky air filters if needed.

If you have health issues taking up your time, the last thing you want to be doing is spending time tending to “stuff.” When your time is limited, you absolutely must make the best of it. When you’re too exhausted to move, the stress of a mess is not worth your thoughts.

Here are some strategies that I have used over the years to manage my chronic fatigue.

In the kitchen: Making sure the fridge and pantry are always free of expired food makes it easier to fill them with healthy stuff – even if that “healthy stuff” is merely “healthier than normal” convenience food so that I don’t have to spend time cooking. The less digging around in the fridge, the more time I have to eat and then rest.

On the dining room table: I don’t always have the energy to clean off the dining room table, as my energy comes and goes. Instead, I keep a basket to pile the stuff into – then I go through it later when I do have the time or energy.

In the bedroom: I have four pillows and two blankets on my bed, making it easier to pull the room together quickly.

Overall: I have a place for everything. Clean up takes much less time when I’m not trying to recreate the wheel of organization every single day.

Chronic illness can be so incredibly hard. Fortunately, I have some good news in my situation: a diagnosis! After fifteen(!) years of being blown off by doctors, I finally had a sleep study – and a diagnosis: obstructive sleep apnea! (Awareness plug here: OSA is underdiagnosed in women, especially young women. If you have health issues like rising blood pressure, fatigue, depression and anxiety, consider talking to your doctor! I’m serious!)

It is now Sunday evening and I asked my future-fiance this today:

Me: “It’s 4:38 on a Sunday…notice anything different about me?!”

Him: “You’re not asleep!!!”

Another perk: when I had to drag the CPAP machine home, there was no lack of space for where it would go. When you’re mindful of your home, there is always room for what is important.